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Excerpted from an article by Deborah Netburn in the Los Angeles Times:

Across the ocean, an enormous number of animals hide in the deep, dark waters during the day, and then swim upward during the cover of night to take advantage of the food generated in the sunlit part of the ocean.

 

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Researchers say that more must be learned about the biology of a number of eel species in order to counter their global decline. The cumulative impact of habitat loss, pollution, over farming, disease, and changing ocean currents/climate, are believed to disrupt the life cycle of eel species, who feed and grow in a range of salinities, but breed in the ocean. Furthermore, a lack of long-term datasets about eels could hamper conservation efforts.

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The partners of the European Smart Submarine Robots Working in Co-operative Networks Project (SWARMs) organized the first demonstration of the project, with the participation of PLOCAN as a partner, in Mangalia, Romania, between the 3rd and the 11th of July.

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Scientists are trying a new, interactive way to understand ocean current data with the help of high-resolution global ocean simulations. In the part of the global visualization shown, the Loop Current, the origin of the Gulf Stream, features prominently. Surface water speeds are shown ranging from 0 meters per second (dark blue) to 1.25 meters per second (cyan). The video is running at one simulation day per second.

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A large circular sea ice floe covered with melt ponds and surrounded by smaller floes, as seen from an Operation IceBridge flight on July 17, 2017. Photo credit: NASA/Nathan Kurtz.

Earlier this year Arctic sea ice sank to a record low wintertime extent for the third straight year. Now NASA is flying a set of instruments north of Greenland to observe the impact of the melt season on the Arctic's oldest and thickest sea ice.

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Gulf of Mexico dead zone in July 2017. At 8,776 square miles, this year's dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest ever measured. Image Courtesy of N. Rabalais, LSU/LUMCON.

Scientists have determined this year’s Gulf of Mexico “dead zone,” an area of low oxygen that can kill fish and marine life, is 8,776 square miles, an area about the size of New Jersey. It is the largest measured since dead zone mapping began there in 1985.

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