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Participants at The Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 project regional mapping meeting for the Atlantic and Indian Oceans gathered in Palisades, New York.

The first Nippon Foundation-GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project regional mapping meeting for the Atlantic and Indian Oceans took place this month at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. The meeting in Palisades, NY, was chaired by Dr Vicki Ferrini, who leads the Seabed 2030 Atlantic and Indian Ocean Regional Data Centre.

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This sea anemone–inspired nanoparticle may be the future for ensuring clean water for the world's population. Credit: Nature Nanotechnology.

The body structure of the majestic sea anemone not only makes it an effective marine predator and homestead for other species such as the clownfish, but it also acts as a template for an effective way of cleaning water sources, according to new research published in Nature Nanotechnology by scientists at Yale University, USA and Peking University, China.

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Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. She was cited for providing "new and sustained insights on the ecological responses of Arctic continental shelves to climate change and extraordinary leadership in scientific program development."

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The gribble is a ravenous wood-boring crustacean and may play an important role in producing biofuels. Credit: Professor Simon Cragg/ Dr Graham Malyon - University of Portsmouth.

The tiny group of wood-boring crustaceans known as gribble may look innocent, but their rampant feeding habits can cause widespread devastation to the wooden structures submerged in our seas.

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The Alvin deep-sea submersible awaits another collection run in the Guaymas Basin in November 2018. Credit: Brett Baker.

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow. The scientists suggest that the newly identified bacteria could be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and could one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

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A 2014 scene from Trawler Reef in the northern part of the Great Barrier Reef. Ryan McMinds

When it comes to the well-being of coral reefs, for many years scientists focused on bleaching, an event that can endanger corals and the diverse marine ecosystems that they support. In bleaching, high temperatures or other stressors cause corals to expel Symbiodinium, the beneficial, brightly colored microbes that would normally share excess energy and nutrients with corals. Bleaching ultimately starves corals and endangers the entire reef ecosystem.

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Photo by Drew Bewely, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Alvin, the country's only deep-diving research submersible capable of carrying humans to the sea floor, reached another milestone in its long career on November 25, 2018, when the sub made its 5,000th dive during an expedition to the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.

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