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The Alvin deep-sea submersible awaits another collection run in the Guaymas Basin in November 2018. Credit: Brett Baker.

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute have discovered nearly two dozen new types of microbes, many of which use hydrocarbons such as methane and butane as energy sources to survive and grow. The scientists suggest that the newly identified bacteria could be helping to limit the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and could one day be useful for cleaning up oil spills.

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A 2014 scene from Trawler Reef in the northern part of the Great Barrier Reef. Ryan McMinds

When it comes to the well-being of coral reefs, for many years scientists focused on bleaching, an event that can endanger corals and the diverse marine ecosystems that they support. In bleaching, high temperatures or other stressors cause corals to expel Symbiodinium, the beneficial, brightly colored microbes that would normally share excess energy and nutrients with corals. Bleaching ultimately starves corals and endangers the entire reef ecosystem.

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Photo by Drew Bewely, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Alvin, the country's only deep-diving research submersible capable of carrying humans to the sea floor, reached another milestone in its long career on November 25, 2018, when the sub made its 5,000th dive during an expedition to the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California.

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Enie Hensel with a drone at a research site in The Bahamas. Photo credit: Duncan Brake.

New research from North Carolina State University demonstrates that consumer-grade drones are effective tools for monitoring marine species across multiple sites in the wild. The work shows that the technology can be a valuable platform for scientists and conservationists interested in studying populations of sharks, rays, sea turtles and other marine megafauna.

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Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. She was cited for providing "new and sustained insights on the ecological responses of Arctic continental shelves to climate change and extraordinary leadership in scientific program development."

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The Mexican tetra exists in two distinct forms: A surface-dwelling form with eyes (top) and a blind, cave-dwelling form without eyes (bottom). Credit: National Institutes of Health.

Understanding why some Mexican tetra fish regenerate their hearts after injury and why others develop scars may bring scientists one step closer to developing strategies to heal the human heart, according to new research published in Cell Reports and carried out by scientists at University College London and the University of Oxford.

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The earwax of the blue whale and other baleen whales can be analysed to look at stress levels. Credit: Flip Nicklin/National Geographic.

A ground-breaking new study published in Nature Communications and carried out by scientists at Baylor University College of Arts & Sciences, USA, has shed light on the effects of both manmade and environmental factors on the stress levels of baleen whales.

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In 2016, Peru was the fifth biggest producer of marine capture fisheries in the world, with a total production of 3.7 million tonnes. Credit: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

The cold, nutrient-rich waters of the Humboldt Current make Peru one of the most successful fisheries in the world, boasting over two thousand different fish, molluscan, and crustacean species and producing 3.7 million tonnes of fished goods in 2016 alone.

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