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LarvalBot gently squirts the coral larvae onto damaged reef areas. Credit: Queensland University of Technology

A ‘reef protector’ robot from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is set to become 'mother' to hundreds of millions of baby corals in a special delivery coinciding with this month's annual coral spawning on the Great Barrier Reef.

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Science and support teams from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are gearing up for the start of the Antarctic summer field season. A major focus for the season is the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), one of the largest potential sources of future sea-level rise.

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Infographic shows where different whale species congregate around the world. Credit: Hannah Cubaynes

Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies’ DigitalGlobe, to detect, count and describe four different species of whales.

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Clyde Mackenzie of NOAA Fisheries and assistant Edgartown shellfish constables Warren Gaines (center) and Jason Mallory (right) during an October 15 check on the bay scallop populations on Martha's Vineyard. Photo © Deborah M. Gaines

The 85 percent decline in US commercial shellfish landings between 1980 and 2010 are likely linked to environmental factors, not overfishing.

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Kelp forests provide habitat for a diverse array of sea life, from finfish and shellfish to corals and sponges. Such biodiversity could change if ocean storms become more frequent. (Submitted photo)

A large-scale, long-term experiment on kelp forests off Southern California brings new insight to how the biodiversity of coastal ecosystems could be impacted over time as a changing climate potentially increases the frequency of ocean storms.

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For each of the past 25 years, oceans have absorbed an amount of heat energy that is 150 times the energy humans produce as electricity annually, according to a study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and Princeton University.

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Vietnam is the fourth largest producer of seafood from aquaculture, cultivating 3.7 million tonnes of fish in 2017. Credit: Ken Opprann.

The Mekong river delta in Vietnam is the largest inland fishery in the world and the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) is farmed here in vast amounts, with approximately 1.1 million tonnes of fish being cultured over 5000 hectares.

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Maps showing areas of the seafloor which have been affected, to varying degrees, by the increasing acidification of the oceans as a result of human activities. Credit: McGill University

The ocean floor as we know it is dissolving rapidly as a result of human activity, according to study published in PNAS.

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