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Male humpback whales use a series of repetitive sounds known as ‘whale song’ to help attract a mate. Credit: Tobias Friedrich.

Noise produced during shipping activities can reduce or stop the singing behaviour of male humpback whales, according to new research published in PLOS One by scientists at the Ogasawara Whale Watching Association and Hokkaido University, Japan.

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The Elliptio complanate freshwater mussel, one of the two species examined by the research team. Credit: Westcott Phillip.

Strontium, a metallic element associated with the wastewater of fracking, has been found to accumulate inside the shells of freshwater mussels, according to new research carried out at Penn State and Union College.

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With the United States being pummeled over the last couple of years with several high-category, high-damage hurricanes, the University of Delaware's (UD) Cristina Archer discovered an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: they lessen the precipitation caused by these devastating storms.

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A sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) battles its way up Hansen Creek to reach its mating grounds. Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington.

The life of a sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is one which can be compared to that of a character in a Shakespearean novel.

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Tropical corals living in more productive waters take advantage of the increased food availability and these feeding habits can be predicted from satellites orbiting our planet, reveals new research. How much and what corals eat has been a critical knowledge gap in coral biology. The information is essential for understanding how corals are likely to persist in a warming ocean.

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