12
Wed, Dec

Microscopic fragments of plastic -- or microplastics -- are pieces of plastic less than 5 mm in diameter and have been widely regarded as a global marine pollutant. Credit: Current Biology, Wright et al.

Microplastics, defined as plastic particles less than 5 millimeters in size, have caused quite a storm within the scientific community over the last decade. Concern surrounding their impact on the marine environment has resulted in bans on microbeads being used in cosmetics as well as public outcry directed towards textile manufacturers, after it was found that a single clothes wash may release up to 700,000 microplastic fibres.

Add a comment

The epaulette shark is a master at adapting to its environment. It is capable of surviving complete anoxia for an hour without ill effects and it’s paired fins allow it to walk across the land in search of better conditions. Credit: Matthew Oldfield Photography.

Coral reefs are synonymous with stunning natural beauty and an incredible amount of biodiversity.

Add a comment

This true-color image, captured by the NOAA-20 satellite on July 30, 2018, shows a large phytoplankton bloom in the Barents Sea. Credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

Phytoplankton blooms that form the base of the marine food web are expanding northward into ice-free waters where they have never been seen before, according to new research.

Add a comment

Changes in Atlantic Ocean sea surface temperatures can be used to predict extreme climatic variations known as El Niño and La Niña more than a year in advance, according to research conducted at Korea's Pohang University of Science and Technology and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Add a comment

The giant oceanic manta ray (Manta birostris) uses lobe-shaped structures to bounce plankton off their gill filters and into their mouth. Credit: S Kajiura/Florida Atlantic University

Researchers at Oregon State University have recently discovered that manta rays are able to filter plankton from seawater using a system never seen before in the natural or industrial world. The findings, published in Science Advances, describe a unique mechanism which resists clogging and therefore offers a new approach for designing filtration systems on an industrial scale.

Add a comment

About a quarter of the world's seafood caught in the ocean comes from bottom trawling, a method that involves towing a net along the seabed on continental shelves and slopes to catch shrimp, cod, rockfish, sole and other kinds of bottom-dwelling fish and shellfish. The technique impacts these seafloor ecosystems because other marine life and habitats can be unintentionally killed or disturbed as nets pass across the seafloor.

Add a comment

More Articles ...