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Invasive algae Gracilaria Salicornia forming dense mats over a Hawaiian coral reef. Credit: eorhawaii.org

Macroalgae, known commonly to most as ‘seaweed’ plays an important role in many of the products we use on a day to day basis from toothpaste to cosmetics. However, intensive algal growth caused by human impacts such as overfishing and climate change is one of the biggest indicators of stress on coral reefs. The effects, often permanent, can reduce biodiversity, diminish the economic value of reefs and even kill them.

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Over a dozen international researchers from the Ocean Solutions Initiative--including scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI), and Sorbonne University--have evaluated the potential of thirteen ocean-based measures to counter climate change.

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Research conducted at Princeton University found less nitrogen pollution in the open ocean off the East Coast of the United States than previously estimated. The researchers evaluated nitrogen levels in the calcium carbonate skeleton of this living brain coral (Diploria labyrinthiformis). Photo courtesy of the researchers

When nitrogen-based fertilizers flow into water bodies, the result can be deadly for marine life near shore, but what is the effect of nitrogen pollution far out in the open ocean?

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PCBs remain within the milk of the mother whale which can then passed down to their offspring. Credit: David Ellifrit, Center for Whale Research.

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) were once widely used as insulators and coolants in the manufacturing of electrical goods across the world. Despite a near-global ban of PCBs nearly 30 years ago, the highly persistent and environmentally toxic pollutant is still having a detrimental effect on the health of marine wildlife.

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Paper authors Brennan Phillips (left) and David Gruber (right) pilot a manned research submarine in the deep sea. Their soft robotic arms could one day allow marine biologists to conduct experiments in submarine-based underwater research labs. Credit: Brennan Phillips

A new, modular soft robotic arm gives deep-sea researchers better dexterity for embracing delicate sea life

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